A quick primary election day look at Texas Democrats' and Republicans' ideological assessments of their elected officials

With at least some Texans going to the polls to vote in primary elections, it's a good time to take a look at the ideological orientation of Texas partisans. In a piece in the Texas Tribune yesterday, we looked at the ideological dispositions of Texas Democrats in the context of the Democratic presidential nominating contest. That exercise informed (some of) the selection of the particular data snapshots presented below (like the perhaps suprising results from Democrats by location and age). But with the related processes of ideological sorting and increased polarization taking place in Texas (as in much of the rest of the US) and a number of contested primary races in Congressional and state legislative seats taking place, it's worth revisiting the state of ideological play in both parties – particularly given that judgements about the liberalism of Democratic voters and the conservatism of Repulican voters in the state will be part of the unfolding punditry and post-election analysis over the next 48 hours. 

The graphics below present different looks at the responses in the latest University of Texas/Texas Tribune Poll to two recurring questions we ask of partisans.

"Overall, do you think that Democratic elected officials in Texas are liberal enough, too liberal, or not liberal enough?"

and

"Overall, do you think that Republican elected officials in Texas are conservative enough, too conservative, or not conservative enough?"

We may add more observations, time permitting, as Election Day unfolds. But for now, here are the snapshots, followed by graphics with trends in ideological identification for Democrats and Republicans for macrolevel context. 

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categoryTotal
Liberal enough30%
Too liberal6%
Not liberal enough44%
Don't know/No opinion20%

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CategoryLean DemocratNot very strong DemocratStrong Democrat
Liberal enough24%29%35%
Too liberal5%15%4%
Not liberal enough51%32%44%
Don't know/No opinion21%24%18%

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CategoryLiberalsModeratesConservatives
Liberal enough29%31%39%
Too liberal3%12%9%
Not liberal enough54%25%30%
Don't know/No opinion14%33%22%

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CategoryWhiteBlackHispanic
Liberal enough23%36%36%
Too liberal5%7%7%
Not liberal enough58%26%39%
Don't know/No opinion14%32%17%

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CategoryMaleFemale
Liberal enough30%30%
Too liberal9%4%
Not liberal enough47%42%
Don't know/No opinion14%23%

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CategoryUrbanSuburbanRural
Liberal enough32%30%28%
Too liberal9%4%5%
Not liberal enough43%46%37%
Don't know/No opinion16%20%30%

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Category18-2930-4445-6465+
Liberal enough32%27%33%29%
Too liberal6%10%4%4%
Not liberal enough42%44%46%42%
Don't know/No opinion20%20%17%25%

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CategoryLean RepublicanNot very strong RepublicanStrong Republican
Conservative enough55%49%59%
Too conservative16%7%5%
Not conservative enough24%30%30%
Don't know/No opinion6%14%7%

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CategoryLiberalsModeratesConservatives
Conservative enough0%43%60%
Too conservative88%16%5%
Not conservative enough12%20%29%
Don't know/No opinion0%20%6%

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CategoryMaleFemale
Conservative enough57%55%
Too conservative9%7%
Not conservative enough31%24%
Don't know/No opinion2%13%

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CategoryUrbanSuburbanRural
Conservative enough56%57%56%
Too conservative7%10%6%
Not conservative enough29%25%32%
Don't know/No opinion9%8%6%

Below are trend data in response to our standard 7-point ideological identification question.  Note that leaners are folded in with the party they lean toward in each partisan category.  (That is, respondents who initially identify as independent, but then indicate that they lean toward one party or the other, are included in the category of their partisan inclination. This leave a total of 9% independent.)

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PollLiberalModerateConservative
July 200835%55%10%
October 200844%36%19%
March 200955%30%15%
June 200949%34%17%
October 200941%48%10%
February 201044%45%11%
May 201045%40%15%
September 201052%34%14%
October 201049%34%17%
February 201143%38%19%
May 201145%45%9%
October 201154%36%10%
February 201254%34%13%
May 201238%51%11%
October 201243%45%13%
February 201352%34%14%
June 201353%36%11%
October 201343%43%14%
February 201446%38%16%
June 201447%40%13%
October 201453%36%11%
February 201545%40%15%
June 201548%38%14%
October 201552%37%10%
February 201638%49%13%
June 201644%48%8%
October 201643%47%10%
February 201744%44%11%
June 201765%25%10%
October 201763%27%10%
February 201856%29%14%
June 201864%28%9%
October 201860%28%12%
February 201967%23%10%
June 201965%26%9%
October 201950%33%17%
February 202064%27%9%

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PollLiberalModerateConservative
July 20082%25%73%
October 20082%20%78%
March 200913%16%71%
June 20096%12%82%
October 20091%15%84%
February 20102%9%89%
May 20101%10%89%
September 20100%9%91%
October 20102%8%90%
February 20113%14%84%
May 20112%11%87%
October 20112%11%87%
February 20121%12%86%
May 20121%22%77%
October 20121%23%76%
February 20132%12%87%
June 20131%14%85%
October 20133%20%77%
February 20141%19%79%
June 20142%12%86%
October 20142%13%85%
February 20151%16%83%
June 20154%16%81%
October 20152%14%85%
February 20162%17%82%
June 20161%15%83%
October 20161%18%81%
February 20173%23%74%
June 20172%11%87%
October 20172%14%83%
February 20184%10%86%
June 20183%13%84%
October 20183%11%85%
February 20194%11%85%
June 20195%13%83%
October 20195%14%81%
February 20202%15%83%