Congressional Turnover in Context

Democrat Gene Green of Houston's retirement brings the number of Texas legislators not returning to the nation's capitol to six as the filing period for office began over the weekend. While Green is only the second Democrat to announce that he won't be returning to the U.S. House of Representatives (along with Beto O'Rourke, who is instead running to replace Texas Senator Ted Cruz in the upper chamber), each recent announcement by Republican Congressman has resulted in a new round of speculation about what these retirements mean for 2018. The questions are both local – like who is going to fill these seats and how will those replacements reverberate down the ballot – but also global, about the 2018 Election, the Republican Party, and the potential impact of Donald Trump. While these are both interesting and worthy lines of inquiry, a simpler question to ask first is:  what the usual Congressional churn looks like in the Texas delegation?

To that end, we have graphics! As always, these can be accessed here and shared, embedded, or even downloaded and printed out – if you're into that sort of thing.

Congressional Turnover in the Texas Delegation

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CongressTotal Turnover
105th2
106th1
107th2
108th7
109th2
110th1
111th3
112th4
113th3
114th2
115th*6

Congressional Turnover in the Texas Delegation

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CongressVoluntary RetirementInvoluntary RetirementPrimary Election LossGeneral Election Loss
105th1100
106th1000
107th2000
108th2113
109th0002
110th0001
111th0003
112th2011
113th1011
114th2000
115th*6000

Congressional Turnover in the Texas Delegation

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CongressDemocratic TurnoverRepublican Turnover
105th20
106th01
107th11
108th52
109th02
110th10
111th30
112th22
113th12
114th11
115th*24